Archive for the ‘book’ Category

 
 

Jonathan Safran Foer’s novel Tree of Codes is cut out of the original novel The Street of Crocodiles by Bruno Schulz. Although the most time I’ve spent with it was this game of peekaboo.

The Internet Report

Back in 1995, Morgan Stanley produced a snapshot of internet affairs for investors, simply titled The Internet Report. Today the report remains an entertaining reminder of what it’s like to peer with enthusiasm into a dense fog.

 
 
 
 

Book report

 
 

A slice of the scene the NY Art Book Fair a few Sundays back.

The Werkplaats Typographie set up a hopping book swap on a ping-ping table called Feed the Library.

Publication Studio, with Sam Gould, Mike Wolf, and Matthew Stadler at the helm, whisked ideas from thin air, producing and printing books onsite.

At bottom, artist Minori Kanda’s book with underwear.

 
 

Once inside a rainforest

“Once inside a rainforest, structural complexity is obvious. How immense it seems, and how dark and enclosing as dense canopy foliage shades the forest interior, especially in the attenuated morning light.”

 

“The bad news is that for students of Neotropical biology, it will not be possible to identify accurately most plants to the level of species. There are just too many look-alike species, and the ranges of many species are not precisely known….”

 
 

“As we continue our perambulations through the rainforest we cannot help but notice the plethora of vines and epiphytes. Trees are so laden with these hitchhikers that it is often a challenge to discern the actual crown from the myriad ancillary plants. With binoculars and practice, however, we can begin to make some sense of what is growing where and on what.”

 

“In many tropical forests, even the epiphytes can have epiphytes. Tropical leaves are often colonized by tiny lichens, mosses and liverworts, which grow only after the leaf has been tenanted by a diverse community of microbes: bacteria, fungi, algae and various yeasts, as well as microbial animals such as slime molds, amoebas, and ciliates. This tiny community that lives among the leaves is termed the epiphyllus community, and its existence adds yet another dimension to the vast species richness of tropical moist forests.”

 

All quotes from James Kirchner’s A Neotropical Companion