Archive for the ‘technology’ Category

Genesis mint

VeilsStill from Veils/span>

Today I minted my genesis nft on Objkt, check it out here. I’m approaching these as an ongoing experiment: I’ll probably mint a new piece once every other week for the next few months and see how it evolves.

New group exhibition

My painting Most Mystic is included in Garden, a group exhibition at Ladies’ Room through January 31, 2023.

Most Mystic, acrylic and mica on canvas, 20 x 24 inches, 2020

Kristin Posehn’s paintings are inspired by the reflections of skyscrapers into skyscrapers, a phenomena we can observe in dense financial centers around the world. In her vision, the reflective patterns of these mega-structures become delicate, atmospheric, and haunting glyphs that never repeat. Her paintings change and play in a sly dance with light, evoking languages at once ancient and futuristic.

Most Mystic
Most Mystic

New solo exhibition

Ghost Pearls

Ghost Pearls

October 12, 2022 – January 20, 2023

Granary Arts

Ephraim, UT

Ghost Pearls is an architectural sculpture that explores spaces of connection and mediation. The work is based on research into local and historical forms of lace-making, early digital art, and contemporary virtual space.

The sculpture is made from 1,005 pieces of rigid, individually cut mirror that are woven into an open, lace-like form, and suspended from the central beam of the gallery. As mirror, the work reflects both the viewer and surrounding architecture in an experiential play that raises questions of mediation and virtuality.

Ghost Pearls references lace in the collection of the Fairview Museum; conversations with local and regional lace-makers; historical links between lace, value, and time; the 1964 digital artwork Ninety Parallel Sinusoids with Linearly Increasing Period by A. Michael Noll; and works of the Light and Space movement.

Work in progress

Work in progress

Space pics

Terrestrial photography was feeling a little dull, I’m into space pics now. (Brancusi is of course an exception, in everything he touched he channeled other worlds, continued study.) The heavenly bods are positively gravitational, it’s delicious to muse on such hunks. This class of image is close to what we see in digital art these days—infinite space, gradients, spheres. Yet digital images don’t often muster gravity and magnetism. In a way digital simulations have too much freedom, the constraints of physics generate power, learning from simplicity and scale.

TitanTitan from Cassini via Jacint Roger
ThorThor’s Helmet (NGC 2359) by Rolf Wahl Olsen
Saturn and TitanSaturn and Titan from Cassini via Val Klavens